Puppy Mill Seller Hits Animal Welfare Advocates with Restraining Order

Companion Animal Protection Society Volunteers

Carole Davis, West Coast director for Companion Animal Protection Society (CAPS), will not be silenced, even when slapped with a restraining order.

In July, when she visited pet store I Heart Puppies in Corona Del Mar, California, she spotted puppy mill dogs for sale.

Davis said, “We have irrefutable evidence of the inhumane pet factories that supply her store. It will not work. I will not be intimidated and will continue to tell the ugly truth about I Heart Puppies.”

CAPS is a national, non-profit organization that specializes in investigating pet factory cruelty, aka puppy mills. They investigate pet stores as well as Internet pet dealers. CAPS tracks consumer complaints and works with law enforcement, government agencies and lawmakers around the country to create animal protection legislation for animals sold as pets.

One of the main functions of CAPS is to investigate puppy mills and the pet stores who buy from them, so Davis did her job: She sent I Heart Puppies a letter demanding that the store stop selling puppy mill dogs and instead host animal adoptions in the store.

The response to her letter? Nothing. Instead, Brooke Ann Bradford, owner of the store, filed a harassment complaint and restraining order against Davis. The hearing is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. on August 10.

Said Davis,

I am so delighted to see local Newport Beach dog lovers speaking out against the cruel pet trade. It is so encouraging to see people speaking out for these animals. There are way too many adoptable dogs and cats in the Orange County shelters literally dying for good homes. Until the cages in the shelter are empty, it is unconscionable to sell dogs.

CAPS has been instrumental in enacting humane legislation about puppy mills in the cities of West Hollywood, Los Angeles, Glendale and Hermosa Beach, with Irvine soon to follow.

Of note is that in March, the City of Los Angeles voted for a citywide ban on puppy mills and major renovations to restrictions for puppy breeders and the stores that sell pets. Although it will probably take a long time to notice a change, it’s a big step in the right direction. Let’s hope Orange County follows suit.

Although I Heart Puppies has been open only since July 1, it has already drawn the focus of animal welfare activists on a national level, said the Corona del Mar Today. On a local level, Davis and CAPS have planned the I Heart Puppies Protest, which will take place on Sunday, August 7, from 1 to 3 p.m. at 2801 East Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.

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From Around the Web

  • MDurham

    So CAPS thinks it is above the law, huh? About par. Throwing around the derogatory term “puppy mills”–and including *any commercial animal industry* in that class–has become all too fashionable, thanks mostly to the “animal rights” industry leader, H$U$, and followed up in lockstep by the ASPCA, ALDF, PeTA, AWI, et al. Wake up, people. “Animal rights” is NOT “animal welfare” and the AR industry’s *propaganda mill* BIG LIES are what should be denounced!

    • Phoebe

      What’s sad is that people like you who haven’t a clue what you’re talking about comment on these articles. “propaganda mill”? What are you saying…there’s no such thing as a puppy mill? I live in the middle of puppy mill country and there are thousands of these hell holes shipping puppies all over the country every day. ALL….and I repeat…ALL pet stores get their puppies from puppy mills. Reputable breeders DO NOT SELL THEIR PUPPIES TO PET STORES. If you had a clue what you were talking about, you would know that. And I’m not a supporter or a fan of the HSUS or PETA.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “What’s sad is that people like you who haven’t a clue what you’re talking about comment on these articles.”
        “If you had a clue what you were talking about, you would know that. ”

        Please do not make insulting or inflammatory statements or I will have to ban you from this conversation.

      • Clear Eyes Full Hearts.

        Phoebe – You wrote “… ALL… And I repeat ALL pet stores get their puppies from puppy mills.” I am trying to sort out all the strong emotional statements surrounding this campaign against this pet store owner – from verifiable facts. I just want to get to the truth here. Will you please provide proof of your assertion? Right now I can’t seem to find anything more than heated rhetoric – and maybe that’s because you feel so passionately about your cause. But for myself (and perhaps others who come from a background/education heavily emphasizing critical thinking skills) – I need objective proof. I can’t simply believe it’s true because you use all capital letters to spell out “all.” So will you please provide a URL citing independent, objective proof of your statement? It would go a long way toward making your arguments more compelling. Thank you.

  • alice in LALA land

    Demanding? Who is she to demand that a business stop LEGAL transactions and DEMAND that a business adhere to her idea of what a business should be?
    I would not say the shop owner’s response was nothing. It was an appropriate response to anyone who sends you a threatening letter… you take it to the police and file a restraining order.
    These people are no “animal welfare activists”. They are thugs — white wealthy women, but thugs none the less.
    I hope the judge upholds the restraining order.

  • Geraldine Clarke

    Good for Bradford!!! Is there any way any of us not near Corona Del Mar can support her?

    And I’d LOVE to see what “irrefutable evidence ” Davis has that the puppies in that store are coming from bad conditions. No one opening up a pet store now in CA is going to have puppies raised in bad conditions because they KNOW that they will be targeted. But I’m sure that Davis and her ilk consider any puppy raised for profit to be coming from “inhumane puppy mill”.

    In my 40+ years of breeding dogs to keep my ancient, rare and wonderful breed alive, I’ve only had 7 litters of pups, all of whom had long, happy lives (and never made me even one cent of profit) yet I have been accused many times of being a “puppy mill” when I oppose “animal rights” fanatics like Davis. In the halls of the State Capitol, I was even spat in the face and shoved up against a wall while I was being accused of that when I was there to oppose AB1634, a very, very bad AR bill.

    “Animal rights” types like Davis use the term “puppy mill” as a weapon that the press usually passes along on without investigating the evidence. We MUST educate the Media!

    • Phoebe

      OMG…..and yet another one who is cluless rambling on about something she knows nothing about. Again….ALL PET STORE PUPPIES COME FROM PUPPY MILLS. Why don’t you do some actual research before you go spewing your ignorance. But then people like you who contribute to the overpopulation and murder of innocent homeless dogs are always the first ones to attack animal rights activists. And don’t you worry, THE MEDIA’S EDUCATION HAS ONLY JUST BEGUN.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        Please keep your comments civilized and refrain from using insults or inflammatory language. This is your second warning.

  • Stella

    Hmm … I wonder if any of these posts are from Bradford’s friends/family?

  • MDurham

    Nope. Don’t know the person. Just am aware of the increasing anti-animal-commerce actions that AR-zombie people seem to think they are entitled to, regardless of the *law* and *constitutional rights* of others.

    • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

      Everyone has the same legal and constitutional rights. Can you support your opinion that CAPS is infringing on the rights of anyone?

    • Time4Dogs

      Ever heard of the Animal Enterprise Terrorist Act? Kooks who terrorize businesses involving animals can be arrested and charged under that law. I’d love to see it applied to CAPS and other fringe groups who bully legitimate business owners.

  • alice in LALA land

    No, I do not know either party. I am concerned with the LEGALITY of this. Threatening letters and demands about a legal business are items that are detrimental to our way of life. Protesters have their rights. We even let people scream obscenities at funerals of people who have died of AIDS. But “shopping” and loitering inside the establishment with the intent of harm is not protesting; it is intimidation.

    Attempts to interfere with the legal running of a legal business should be monitored. I hope the restraining order is upheld. Not so much for this case but for ALL cases where shopkeepers are threatened for doing legal business. If you do not like it… change the law. Don’t harass people.

    Perhaps Ms. Davis (*edited for inappropriate language*) should set up her own pet store to sell dogs she thinks should be sold. Nothing is stopping her from doing that, is there. it is called competition. Ms. Davis… set up shop.. give away your dogs and cats.. nobody cares.. make your store more appealing than the other place and put them out of business that way.. but oh so much easier to scream on a street corner and get “publicity” . No one really has to work..

    • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

      “But “shopping” and loitering inside the establishment with the intent of harm is not protesting; it is intimidation.”

      The protest will take place outside, in public areas.

      “Not so much for this case but for ALL cases where shopkeepers are threatened for doing legal business. If you do not like it… change the law. Don’t harass people.”

      Changing the law is what CAPS does … read the article. Our freedoms as US citizens include free speech and the right to peaceful assembly.

    • Jane in Houston

      It is our constitutional right to voice objections to the products or services of any business. As long as our opinions are stated politely it is perfectly legal to tell a business owner that we don’t approve and that we will not patronize that store and that we will encourage others to do the same.
      Puppy mills are under fire because they neglect and abuse the very source of their income. Laws have been made to protect children from being used for profit. Animals deserve the same protection.
      Back yard breeders may take better care of their animals but the point is that it is morally irresponsible to breed animals for profit while almost 5 million are put to death each year .
      I think past trends and/or statistics are not particularly relevant as long as companion animals still die because they are homeless. Patronizing any person or business involved in the breeding of any animal – regardless of that animal’s “monetary worth” – contributes to the murder of others.
      I just want to live long enough to see all shelters become No Kill sanctuaries – either as temporary way stations for pets until they are re-homed – or as permanent havens for the ones who can’t find homes.
      Eradicating puppy mills would be a huge step forward in this direction.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        Thank you for your compassionate post, Jane. Is the situation in Houston any different with respect to pet stores and puppy mill dogs?

        • Jane in Houston

          In Houston the major chain pet stores don’t sell dogs or cats anymore but some small “mom & pop” enterprises do.The ones I questioned claim that they are only selling “unwanted” puppies and kittens that individuals have brought to them and asked them to help find them homes. And I do know of one small store that did just that for a former coworker. Even if their claims are true , the classifieds of the newspapers abound with ads for “purebreds” so it obvious that there are plenty of breeders in the general area. Houston is ranked #2 as a “killing city ” – I think our “shelters” kill something like 80,000 pets each year. There are a lot of people with money here and I am sorry to say that many of them would rather own a status symbol than simply enjoy the companionship of a loving, loyal dog.
          But all is not lost – I volunteer with the fastest growing no kill adoption center / sanctuary in Houston and I predict that before long we will be able to stretch our influence outward . To date we have not focused on puppy mills, hopefully that will change in the near future !

  • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

    These comments are all very interesting, but I am a little surprised that no one is speaking up for the group doing their best to create a humane world for animals.

    As much as I hate to make assumptions about people posting here, I suspect that “Stella” is correct, mostly because the folks who read Pets Adviser are anti-puppy mill, and the sheer number of pro-puppy mill comments on this article is very suspicious.

    Although I’d love to hear everyone’s opinions, trolling and personal attacks are not allowed on this site, so please keep that in mind when you post. Thanks.

    • alice in LALA land

      the original premise was that Ms Davis entered the store and confronted the owner with her accusations and sent a “demand” letter that the business change their ways to her “business model” ( her words not mine) of selling only shelter pets. The store owner felt she needed to report this to the authorities and she did. You have the same rights, indeed you do. You also have the right to peaceful protest but not to interference with her business.
      creating a humane world for animals is an important endeavor, telling people how to run their legal business is also important. your assumptions that “Stella” is correct is just that.. and it is incorrect. There are people who want both a humane environment for pets and a right to run a business. They are not mutually exclusive

    • Geraldine Clarke

      There are lots of groups who “doing their best to create a humane world for animals” including at least a half dozen I work closely with.

      And your comment, “the sheer number of pro-puppy mill comments on this article is very suspicious”, is EXACTLY what I was talking about in my previous comment. Where do you see ANY of us defending bad practices or cruelty in breeding puppies? Or do you think that any breeding at all of dogs makes one an evil “puppy mill”?

      And please don’t give me that absurd argument that “for every puppy you breed, you kill a dog in a shelter.” I have rescued probably 100 times more animals than I have ever bred but I want and need to share my life with a magnificent breed that is NEVER up for adoption in shelters. While pit bull types can be great dogs, they do not fit well into my life and chihuahuas drive me crazy so, even if I wanted to adopt a different breed, the vast majority of dogs in shelters would not work for me. Although I have met many fine animals in shelters, I have never seen one that would fit into my life as well a dog of my breed does. I am not going to let an 8,000 year old breed that makes my heart soar die out because other people are irresponsible.

      Well, actually, I did adopt (and will care well for her for the rest of her life since she is unadoptable) a chi mix that I took sight/unseen because L.A. AC claimed that she was a “pure-bred Papillion” and they were going to put her down because she was vicious. I had never encountered a Pap that was really vicious so I agreed to take her on and, because I have dog-training creds, they let me take her instead of killing her. Well, when she arrived, it was obvious to anyone even mildly familar with dog breeds that she didn’t have a drop of Pap in her and was a chi mix. And she was indeed vicious. We’ve done a lot of work over the years and she is happy now but she will never be reliable around people who are not well-trained dog people. And I am sure she was listed in L.A. AC’s statistics as a “pure-bred”, statistics that are used to condemn good breeders as “puppy mills”.

      Forgive me for posting personal stories, but good breeders are incessantly called “puppy mills” and the media passes that slur along with all the connotations of pups being born and dying in horrific conditions. Well, time after time in cases I’m well familiar with, that is just not true. So I need to put a personal story out there to see if you, like others, will call me a “puppy mill” and we’ll let the readers decide for themselves.

  • Harriet’s Mom

    Obviously none of you that support animal CRUELTY and the sale of puppies has ever set foot in a pound in Southern California! I dare any of you to go to Baldwin pound, South LA, East Valley, Carson, Kern, Devore and walk thru the kennels and see the dogs who will die, PUPPIES and then tell me if you still support the selling of puppies when so many are dying. Hello! Why is it OK to sell dogs when so many get killed? It’s not, and if you support that you are subhuman… This is not the 1950s, 60s or 70s; our shelters are in crisis mode due to extreme pet overpopulation.

    • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

      It might be worth noting that one of the most under-staffed, over-crowded shelters in the Southland is the Orange County one, which serves almost the entire county.

    • alice in LALA land

      no it is not the 50’s 60 or 70′.. you are right.. in those years more dogs were killed than now.. shelter numbers had dropped dramatically in recent years.Things are MUCH BETTER now..I actually work at my local shelter.. and see dogs being shipped out to other places around the country where people are waiting for them..
      no one supports animal cruelty.. you are mistaken..do you not support the selling of any animals? how about horses.. think people should be able to buy one? or should they only ‘adopt”
      As you cans see by my name I live in Southern CA.
      Animals in shelters have nothing to do with the right to conduct a legal business. Protest if you ant to.. but keep it legal and do not intimidate.

      • Phoebe

        Okay…please do share what state, county, shelter is WAITING on dogs. I’ve heard that line of crap so many times but interestingly, not a single person can give me the name of the empty shelter just sitting there waiting on dogs to arrive. However, my facebook feed is overflowing with dogs 24/7 who will be killed TODAY for lack of space. We’d all love to know where these empty shelters are located so we could ship some death row dogs there.

        • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

          You are now banned from making further comments on this thread.

          People, please stop making me do this!

    • Geraldine Clarke

      Again I ask, who do you think is posting in favor of “CRUELTY”? Selling puppies is not cruelty.

      And, yes, I know shelters; I’ve spent a lot of time volunteering in them. I can’t do that right now so I foster instead.

      And, yes, this is not the 50’s, 60’s or 70’s. They used to kill lots more animals per capita back then. You need to do some basic research on shelter stats. Hardly any animal taken into a shelter back then came out alive.

      We CAN become a No Kill nation. Winograd and Bill Bruce know how to do it and it is not by attacking people but by working with them.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        Most animal lovers equate selling puppies with cruelty. I suggest you do a little reading about puppy mills and their connection with stores that sell animals. Anyone promoting this activity is also promoting cruelty.

        As for for shelter stats, I’m quite familiar with them. Fewer animals were euthanized pre-1970 because there were fewer animals. Puppy mills and backyard breeders didn’t start overbreeding until the 1980s.

        Winograd has great ideas, and one of them is getting rid of puppymillers, bybs and the overbreeding of animals. Volunteers like CAPS do the dirty work — and often succeed.

        Honestly, it’s literally impossible for me to believe that someone who has volunteered in shelters, fosters dogs and supports Winogran is supporting a pet store that sells puppymill dogs.

    • Geraldine Clarke

      Tamar, most animal lovers do not equate selling puppies with cruelty. You are fooling yourself if you think that.

      “Fewer animals were euthanized pre-1970 because there were fewer animals”. Uh, yes, which sorta proves my point since there were also a whole lot fewer people in CA back then. The per capita rate of killing was much, much higher then with very few animals getting out of shelters. Statistics need to be looked at very closely before you “quote” them.

      “Puppy mills and backyard breeders didn’t start overbreeding until the 1980s”. Please cite your source for this. Doesn’t compute. In my experience, pre-1980, almost almost all puppies in CA were bred by “back-yard breeders”, usually accidentally. There WAS over-breeding back then since there were so few low-cost neutering facilities and NO public education campaigns to get people to think about where the pups would end up because they were born because they thought that their kids should see the “miracle of life”. We’ve come a long way since then.

      And, BTW, raising planned pups in a back yard is one of the best places to raise them. Mine were all birthed in my bedroom. I find the “backyard breeder” slur almost as offensive as the “puppy mill” one.

      ” Winograd has great ideas, and one of them is getting rid of puppymillers, bybs and the overbreeding of animals”
      Again, you are not citing correct information. For heaven’s sake, look at the cover of his book! The subtitle is “The MYTH of Pet Over-population in America”. There is no over-breeding, just too many people who think that disposing of animals is OK. Please read the book more closely. Winograd and all of us are horrified at kennels that raise animals in dreadful conditions, the true puppy mills, but Winograd is a friend of good breeders, including us backyard ones, because he knows how important we are.

      It seems to me that you are basing your opinions on emotional “animal rights” propaganda and have not taken the time to investigate the truth and statistics behind what you are opining about.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “Tamar, most animal lovers do not equate selling puppies with cruelty. You are fooling yourself if you think that.”

        Although I have no national statistics to support my statement, I do know about a thousand animal lovers, and I’ve yet to meet one that didn’t think that puppy mills and over breeding weren’t cruel. Selling those dogs is also cruel, since the brokers and buyers are making a profit from those animals’ suffering.

        “Fewer animals were euthanized pre-1970 because there were fewer animals”. Uh, yes, which sorta proves my point since there were also a whole lot fewer people in CA back then. The per capita rate of killing was much, much higher then with very few animals getting out of shelters. Statistics need to be looked at very closely before you “quote” them.”

        I’m sorry if I didn’t make that statement clear. There were fewer animals NOT because there were fewer people, but because money-grubbers weren’t yet overbreeding them for profit.

        If you are overbreeding your dogs in your backyard for a profit, then you are certainly a backyard breeder. However, it sounds like you’re a hobby breeder, which means you probably take very good care of your animals. In other words, you aren’t one of the problem breeders discussed in this article or its comments.

        It doesn’t matter what the cover of Winograd’s book says. Just because someone wrote and published a book, it doesn’t mean that their ideas are fact. I don’t believe in his central premise, an opinion that is shared with a great many animal welfare volunteers who have been working in the trenches for years, sometimes decades.

        “Winograd and all of us are horrified at kennels that raise animals in dreadful conditions, the true puppy mills.”

        Then I’m unsure about why you’re arguing these points … it seems we’re on the same side.

        I must caution you that several of your statements seem deliberately inflammatory. As long as this discussion remains civilized, with no personal attacks, I will keep it open for further comments.

        • Animal Lover

          AHhhh – when money changes hands – it’s a SALE! Therefore – your shelters are actually pet stores! Ever look at it that way? They’re making a PROFIT!!! That’s cruel – in your terms – therefore you should be shutting down all the pounds!!!!

        • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

          Profit = Revenue – Expenses

          Since animal welfare expenses very rarely outweigh their revenue, no profit is being made.

          Shelters can only stay afloat through government funding and grants. Rescues operate in the red.

          Based on your comment, one could argue that human adoption facilities are baby stores, which is a ridiculous idea.

    • Animal Lover

      Find out just how many times those dogs have boomeranged back – because they were sold as a breed they weren’t and didn’t behave accordingly – or because they were so un-trained the new owners couldn’t deal with them.
      Find out how many times they count the same dog by swapping with other shelters – to make the stats higher.
      Just think for a min – would ANY UNION worker actually do something that would cost a UNION job?

  • Aggie

    To those sympathizing with the people in the business of selling living, sentient creatures for a profit: “Legal” doesn’t equal “harmless,” “well-intentioned” or “moral,” and the right to make a buck doesn’t supersede the obligation to refrain from causing unnecessary pain.

    Our society has protected many odious and toxic businesses throughout history; the fact that these exploitative businesses operate in accordance with the law means nothing. Industries that exploit animals are increasingly seeking to punish those who expose their wrongdoing and the public, such as the investigators who film what goes on in egg factories and slaugherhouses. The protesters here are exercising their First Amendment rights. If the store is not selling pet factory animals, the owner can just respond with proof of this. Instead, she calls the gendarmes, asks for a restraining order. Why? $$$$.

    Educate yourselves about puppy mills. Four million cats and dogs are euthanized in US shelters every year. And compared to the fate of animals who die a slow death in puppy mills, they are lucky.

    Animals are not things.

    • alice in LALA land

      The owner owes you and the CAPS group nothing. As well intentioned as you might be CAPS is not a legal authority and the burden of proof of any illegal activity is on you and CAPS.
      A restraining order has nothing to do with money. It is a protective judgment against harassment and threat. I imagine a judge will uphold the order or instruct ( he/she is a judge so they do have the authority) that the protest be peaceful and in no way restrict the people who may want to enter the building. That is fair all around, allowing for peaceful protest and legal business both wouldn’t you say so?

    • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

      Outstanding post, Aggie. Thanks!

    • Geraldine Clarke

      (Aggie, this thread is about dogs so I’m not going to get into the incredibly complicated topic of Ag animals.)

      Even though I’m a dyed-in-the-wool liberal, I know that the exchange of money is not an inherently evil act. Shelters and rescues sell animals in every legal sense of the word. Do you want to forbid this, too?

      Los Angeles has had to deal with rigid attitudes like yours for years now and because of their emotional appeal from the depiction of suffering animals (and despite their lack of logic), laws get passed – and the shelter kill rates go up. More laws get passed and the kill rates go up even more. It jumped 10.7% in the first 10 months of Barnette’s tenure (which might not have been all her fault as she had to deal with the implementation of new mandatory-neutering laws; laws of this type always make the kill rates go up wherever they are implemented.) This is obviously NOT working.

      Please, please investigate what Bill Bruce has done in Calgary to see what REALLY works. He’s done amazing stuff up there. Demonizing breeders and pet shop owners is the wrong way to go. Hostility does not promote the co-operation that will change things for the better for the animals. Instead of spending your time and energy on picket lines (which is emotionally satisfying, I’ll grant you), please spend it on activities which will REALLY help animals. As Winograd has proven, we do not have a pet over-population problem, we have a pet relinquishment problem. There are lots of things we can do to change that.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “Instead of spending your time and energy on picket lines (which is emotionally satisfying, I’ll grant you), please spend it on activities which will REALLY help animals.”

        As a direct result of these types of protests, several pet stores in Los Angeles have either closed their doors or changed their business model (more high-quality products and offering shelter animals for adoption instead of selling puppymill dogs). So these activities really do help animals.

        And bless Winograd’s wonderful heart, I could not disagree more with his idea that we don’t have a pet overpopulation problem. Almost 10 years in rescue have proven to me that there is, indeed, a very serious pet overpopulation problem.

  • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

    “That is fair all around, allowing for peaceful protest and legal business both wouldn’t you say so?”

    That’s exactly what’s planned for Sunday: A peaceful protest. It’s no different than people going on strike or rallying for gay rights.

    • Debbie

      I love Tamar

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        Aw, shucks ;-)

  • http://www.caps-web.org carole davis

    Thank you Tamar, for covering this important issue. There seem to be a lot of angry people posting on your forum–people who are inexplicably more angry at the messenger than at the people who are abusing animals and who are selling animals from an abusive breeder.

    In case you are wondering if our investigations are legal, they are. If you are wondering if our protests are legal, they are. The breeders who supply I Heart Puppies are abusing animals and have violated State and Federal laws. One of her breeders tied up a Golden Retriever and shot her in the head, killing her.

    The owner of the puppy mill store, Brooke Bradford, abused the court and her restraining order request was DENIED. You can look that up yourself, it is a public record. She is also duping consumers into thinking she does not buy dogs from inhumane breeders.

    Responsible breeders do not sell to pet stores ever. Hobby breeders who love their breed and treat their few dogs like cherished members of their families want to meet the people who take home their pups. They do not sell to brokers or pet stores period.

    For the person who wrote that she rescues and breeds:
    What breed do you think you cannot find in a shelter? Just curious. 25% of the dogs in the shelter are purebred dogs. I have a Cairn Terrier and a Bichon Frise both from death row.
    Carole Davis, CAPS

    • alice in LALA land

      can I ask why you do not have a pit bull.. the most common dog found in shelters desperately needing homes..although you say your dogs were on ‘death row’ most small dogs in shelters are snapped up right away.. or shipped to places where they can be sold at other facilities. The Hamptons are begging for imports of dogs to sell.. dogs like yours of course.. no pit bulls need apply for life or a “forever home’

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        How do you know Carole doesn’t have a pit bull? Even if she doesn’t, perhaps pitties aren’t the right breed for her lifestyle. I’ve wanted one for years, but it was only recently that we were able to start fostering them. My current foster is Ernie, a delightful, joy-filled 9yo pittie I took from the shelter a few days before he was scheduled to be euthanized.

        I’m not sure where you got your information about shelters shipping dogs elsewhere, but it simply isn’t true the majority of the time. Rescues usually take care of mass transports to other areas that aren’t as overrun as the Los Angeles shelter system. Sometimes regional shelters are able to do transfers to other shelters, but it’s rare unless a rescue group becomes involved.

        Too many people use the argument that “most small dogs in shelters are snapped up right away.” Right now, there are over 50 purebred small dogs at my local shelter, especially PB chihuahuas. The last time I was there — about three weeks ago — I saw several PB malteses, a couple of basset hounds, min pins, JRTs … the list goes on. Small dogs are at as big of a risk as any other dog breed in the shelters, except for pit bulls, of course.

    • Geraldine Clarke

      <<>>

      That was me. How long a list do you want? I can make a VERY long one. There are over 600 breeds of dogs. Well, let’s start with just ONE breed that I know well – salukis. Yes, a saluki occasionally gets through an unlocked gate and ends up in a shelter but saluki people are devoted to protecting this 8,000 year old breed and we always keep tabs on our local shelters. If a dog identified as a saluki comes in, we check it out immediately. If it is indeed a saluki, we usually can figure out the probable breeding and we almost always can locate it’s owner or breeder. If not, saluki rescue which operates all over the country takes it in. It even takes in saluki crosses. At the moment, there are only six pure-bred salukis and two cross-breds available for adoption at saluki rescue for the entire country. (Of course, there is that “rescue” that always has salukis available but there is very good evidence that they are breeding them because they bring in a whole lot of money in “adoption” fees. And, yep, I would agree with you that they are “backyard breeder” scum.)

      Now, I have gone to check out many, many “pure-bred salukis” in shelters and have never found one. I see skinny fine-boned labs and dogs that might have had a whippet grandmother but never a saluki. I’m sure that even though I, as a saluki-owner with 40+ years of experience has verified that they were definitely NOT a salukis, I’m sure that they were still listed as pure-bred salukis in the shelter stats. (They sell so much better that way.)

      That 25% figure you cite is pure fiction. (See my previous post about the “pure-bred Papillion” I took in from L.A. Animal Control.) I’ve been around a lot of shelters and I’d put the figure at about 10% and, if you eliminate chihuahuas, the figure would go much lower.

      Now, I must admit that it can sometimes work in reverse. I know someone who found a pure-bred greyhound in a shelter that had been identified as a pit-bull. When she questioned the shelter worker who classified it, the worker said, “It’s a brindle. Pit bulls are brindle. This is a pit bull”. Ignorance is rife among shelter workers who are rarely well-trained or well-informed. The job doesn’t pay enough in most places to get qualified people.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “if you eliminate chihuahuas, the figure would go much lower.”

        Why would you eliminate chihuahuas?

        I’m not at all surprised there aren’t pb salukis in the shelter. It’s a very rare breed. I’m glad saluki people are as devoted to their breed as I am to dachshunds and pit bulls. We try to get all the doxies out, but we can only do a little for the pitties. There are just too many of them.

        Shelter people are not the best at identifying breeds. However, I’m not talking about their identifications, but mine. I have personally seen hundreds of purebred animals in the shelter.

        • Geraldine Clarke

          I’m sorry but I think you misunderstood me. I am definitely NOT for “eliminating chihuahuas” in any sense of the word except for the fact that, if you take chihuahuas out of the shelter stats, the number of “pure breds” will plumment.

          Salukis are not that rare a breed but are rarely seen so people don’t know much about them. The people who have taken them into their lives will do anything to protect them. In the fight against AB1634, Lloyd Levine (the man behind the bill) made several references about “those saluki people” who opposed him because we kicked his ass. The bill was defeated.

          There is so much that needs to be done to stop the demonization of “pit bulls”! Have you read Vicki Hearne’s “Bandit: Dossier of a Dangerous Dog”? You want to save pits? Read it! It’s a great book.

        • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

          “I am definitely NOT for “eliminating chihuahuas” in any sense of the word except for the fact that, if you take chihuahuas out of the shelter stats, the number of “pure breds” will plumment.”

          I didn’t think you meant “eliminate” them in the mob movie sense … I understood that you meant that if you didn’t count them into the population of purebreds, the statistics would be far different. My question was as to why you wouldn’t count them. A purebred dog is a purebred dog, no matter how many of them are in the shelters.

          BTW, stay tuned … later this week I’ll be publishing a pictorial of healthy, happy purebred dogs that were adopted at animal shelters. I think you’ll be surprised by the number and range of dogs you’ll see.

  • Ccraw

    Orange County animal shelter is exactly 17.0 miles from this stores and KILLS almost 15,000 animals per year. There should be zero puppy stores selling bred dogs for profit when we are killing happy healthy animals due to lack of homes in the same backyard. End of story.

  • alice in LALA land

    Go for it. Repect the law and do your protest.. BUT I must correct you.. Nathan Winograd does not believe in the restriction od any breeders or ‘\getting rid” of any breeders. he says ( and i agree) that shelters need to clean up their act and that No Kill is achievable without restricting any breeding at all.
    This protest is actually somewhat different than going on strike and when people go on strike they actually work for the organization they are trying to improve Rally away. just stay within the laws that are set down for you and the group. you also need to check your stats on when commercial dog breeding first came into being.. it was post WW2 and it was wholeheartedly and financially supported by the US government as a way for farmers to make money after the war when their surplus food was not being purchased by the government for the military.
    Shelter stats have DROPPED since 1970 even with a growth in human population and more people owning pets. Over 75% of owned pets are spayed/neutered.. most animals entering shelters are feral cats that have no owners. They are also the highest number of killed animals in shelters, due to few TRN programs and resistance to those programs by other environmental groups.
    Selling puppies is cruel? Where do you think people should get puppies? Should people be able to give them away or do you think that everyone should stop breeding any dogs at all?
    Your own Southern CA legislator complained that he went to the shelter to get a “lab” but all he could find were “pit bulls” and “chis’.. should he be forced to take one fo those? Or should he be able to buy the puppy of his choice. Personally I think if people want a shelter dog GREAT.. they should then be required to take whatever is available to them locally. Then the pit bulls and chis could find homes without any problem and many lives would be saved. funny though I don;t see people lined up to “adopt” pit bulls.. a pity for they make very nice pets.

    • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

      “Just stay within the laws that are set down for you and the group.”

      That has been the plan from the beginning. CAPS is not PETA. They are reasonable people trying to make the world a better place.

      “you also need to check your stats on when commercial dog breeding first came into being.. it was post WW2 and it was wholeheartedly and financially supported by the US government as a way for farmers to make money after the war when their surplus food was not being purchased by the government for the military.”

      I said “Puppy mills and backyard breeders didn’t start overbreeding until the 1980s.” Prior to that, overbreeding wasn’t an issue.

      “Shelter stats have DROPPED since 1970 even with a growth in human population and more people owning pets. ”

      Please cite your source for these figures.

      “Selling puppies is cruel? Where do you think people should get puppies? Should people be able to give them away or do you think that everyone should stop breeding any dogs at all?”

      Selling puppies bred in puppymill conditions is quite cruel. People should get dogs of any age from shelters or rescues. The only exceptions are dogs bred by reputable, professional breeders who screen their adopters carefully and work hard to strengthen the breed line. No one else should be breeding dogs.

      “Your own Southern CA legislator complained that he went to the shelter to get a “lab” but all he could find were “pit bulls” and “chis’.. should he be forced to take one fo those? ”

      Just because my “own Southern CA legislator” had an experience, it doesn’t make him representative of anyone besides himself. Although there are a tremendous amount of pitties and chis in the shelters, there are also a tremendous amount of labs in the shelters and in rescue. All I can say is that he probably didn’t look very hard.

      “funny though I don;t see people lined up to “adopt” pit bulls.. a pity for they make very nice pets.”

      They are, actually, but the sheer number of pitties in the shelter makes it impossible for all of them to be rescued.

    • http://www.caps-web.org carole davis

      Winograd pulled his numbers from out of a hat. Most pros do not agree. some of his ideas are excellent but not all. He never managed a shelter in L.A., has no idea about the crisis we face with overpop. I’d love to have him be the general manger of our shelter system though. I think he would do a great job. I think he would put better people in place an work better with rescues. But his idea that pet overpopulation is a ‘myth”, well that’s just baloney. We have a crisis. It’s so sad. We certainly don’t need to sell more factory-bred dogs in pet stores! People can go to a responsible breeder or a breed specific rescue org or the shelter. I think this idea is very mainstream.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        I volunteered at the SPCA while Winograd was still managing it. He was amazing at it. Everyone was really sad when he left to go national. If he ran the LA shelter system, things would improve dramatically.

      • Geraldine Clarke

        L.A. had to choose between Winograd and Boks and it chose Boks, If they had not chosen Boks, thousands of animals would still be alive,

  • http://www.caps-web.org carole davis

    We have a spay/neuter ordinance and you people keep insisting that the rising euth rates have to do with animal protection legislation. We have suffered a tsunami of an economic crisis that has forced people out of their jobs, their homes and now, sadly, millions are abandoning their pets. While these animals are killed for space, people buy dogs that are not sterilized, creating even more dogs no one wants. There are TOO MANY DOGS, not enough adopters.

    As far as the anti-puppy mill sales ban in West Hollywood, Glendale, and Los Angeles, we are happy to break the longstanding contracts between abusers of animals and pet stores. These stores are now converting to the humane business model and selling rescued animals that are all sterilized. It makes sense, it saves lives and it puts abusive puppy mills out of business.

    Responsible breeders who cherish their dogs like members of their families are all against puppy mills too. We are talking about mass breeding operations with over 100 dogs, where the dogs are confined 24/7 for life in wire cages out in the elements without shelter. No person with any empathy could think that is a way to treat man’s best friend.
    Carole Davis, CAPS

  • Pam, Newport Beach

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLclYVClXMs&feature=autoshare
    Here is the link to the puppy mill that Ms. Bradford gets her puppies from, along with an Oklahoma mill with over 100 dogs. FYI “Barkworks” uses the same mills. No responsible/hobby breeder sells to puppy stores. When you buy a puppy you are supporting cruelty, mass breeding factories where a dog lives in confinement their whole life until they are dumped or dead it’s cruelty. I truly believe these people posting that it’s not cruel are breeders, friends are just plain ignorant. There will be a special on HBO this month about puppy mills, so people are starting to get educated. Orange County Shelter is overcrowded and killing adoptable animals daily, there sure are alot of heartless people commenting on this.

  • http://www.caps-web.org carole davis

    Alice, did you know that Winograd is an ethical vegan? That means that he is against the eating of any animal products or even wearing them. He hates puppy mills as much as any ethical person does.
    He happens to be wrong about pet overpopulation and commercial breeders love to utilize his books to excuse unhindered cruelty to dogs in pet factories. He knows his arguments are being used by some of the worst offenders of the Animal Welfare Act.

    • alice in LALA land

      i do know that Winograd is an “ethical vegan”‘ I often wonder what an unethical vegan is.. but that aside .. who cares. your dietary choices are your own.. please do not try to force them on others. Winograd does not..I have been to many talks given by Winograd.. not once did I hear him say that he is against breeding of dogs..but I have heard him say many times that shelters need to be hugely reformed.. and the killing needs to stop..if he knows that his argument are being “used’ i am sure he will stop making them.. until then..overpopulation is a myth and shelters need to stop killing dogs and cats..

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “who cares. your dietary choices are your own.. please do not try to force them on others.”

        I didn’t read anything here to support your statement that anyone is trying to force their dietary choices on you or anyone else here. Again, please keep the conversation civilized. Saying “who cares” is not polite.

    • Geraldine Clarke

      “did you know that Winograd is an ethical vegan? ”

      Yes, of course, but what does he feed his animals?

      I hate animal suffering as much as he does and you do but the animals in my life are facultative carnivores (the dogs) and obligate carnivores (the cats). They need meat. Trying to create a vegan diet for them is cruelty in my book.

      Life feeds on life. That is an unescapable fact. Sentience is a spectrum and, if you think that plants are not sentient, you are fooling yourself. Since we all don’t want to starve to death, we need to cope with the ethical dilemmena about where we decide to eat on that sentience spectrum and we all need to make that decision for ourselves.

      I stop at humans, equines and canines but I totally respect people who decide to not eat further down on the spectrum. I can understand why people become vegetarians but rationale behind veganism is beyond me. Anyone who has raised chickens and lactating animals knows that they do no resent the taking of their eggs and milk.

  • Time4Dogs

    It seem ludicrous that the people who want to force everyone to stop breeding are totally ignorant of shelter statistics.
    According to “Maddie’s Fund” president Richard Avanzino, in the 1970s, our country’s animal control agencies were killing, on average, about 115 dogs and cats annually for every 1000 human residents. This amounted to about 24 million shelter deaths every year.
    In recent years, according to Avanzino, annual shelter death numbers have dramatically declined to about 12 per thousand human residents, or about 3.6 million deaths each year. This amounts to a staggering 85% reduction in killing since the 1970s. We have reached a nationwide pet shelter death rate that averages just 1.2% per population.

    Source:
    Fry, Mike,”Reflections from the No Kill Conference in Washington DC”:
    http://www.animalarkshelter.org/animal/ArkArticles.nsf/AllArticles/3A078C33CD079D17862575AD00471A9B

    We already have “rescues” importing dogs into the US by the hundreds of thousands from Taiwan, Mexico, Romania and the Caribbean. “Dogs Without Borders” right here in LA advertises on their website that they will “order” a dog for you from another country if you want it.

    There are actually breeders in these other countries who are breeding for export to meet the pet market in the US. Check out the NAIA website for more info on that. This is a horrible practice because ot only are the dogs bred under questionable circumstances, They can also bring with them raies and parasites. In 2004, a dog from Mexico came in with rabies and just last year, dogs imported from the Caribbean by a rescue group suffered a parvo epidemic where many of them died.

    But hey, it’s OK for rescue groups to import dogs that are bred under unknown conditions, and unknown health history and ancestry, but not OK for pet stores or breeders here to sell dogs who are raised under strict regulation. Go figure.

    • Debbie

      I guess I know where you stand. You want puppy mills to thrive and allow animals to breed like a factory operates. You want animals to suffer with disease. I bought a puppy mill dog and 99% WILL and DO have problems. Mine cost me 1200 in vet bills and that isn’t even half of what others end up paying. Besides the mothers living in filth the puppies have been pulled from their mothers earlier than 8 weeks of age and with doing that, they don’t get all the antibodies from the mothers milk to fight off respiratory problems. When you see these cute little puppies in the store they are 8 weeks old…So that means the breeder (usually from another state) sells them to a broker, (usually from another state) and then they get shipped all over the US. My dog came from Texas…The broker was in Illinois and he ended up in Calif. at 8 weeks of age…so he was pulled away from his mom at approx 6 weeks, not enough time to fight off illness. So you think this is OK? Hmmm you need your head examined.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “Hmmm you need your head examined.”

        Please don’t say stuff like this! Your arguments are so much stronger when you stick to the facts. Thanks!

    • alice in LALA land

      great post.. with FACTS and stats that are ignored by the others posting here

    • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

      “Dogs Without Borders” right here in LA advertises on their website that they will “order” a dog for you from another country if you want it.”

      Yep, they’re a wonderful group! They work with animals in deplorable situations.

      A friend of mine in the Bay Area recently adopted a purebred chocolate lab from China. He’s a wonderful dog, as much deserving of life as any other creature.

  • Aggie

    >>Even though I’m a dyed-in-the-wool liberal, I know that the exchange of money is not an inherently evil act. Shelters and rescues sell animals in every legal sense of the word. Do you want to forbid this, too?<

    Please don't misrepresent what I said. I said that monetary considerations should not supercede ethical ones.

    Shelters and rescues DO sell animals in the legal sense of the word, but they don't sell them to anyone who can pony up. They do a background check of sorts on the people who want the animals to make sure the animals are going to good (or good-enough) homes. (Not perfect, and sometimes tragic mistakes are made, but they do try.) Stores don't do this, which is why your congressman found the shelters full of chiuahuas. People think they're cute, buy them from pet stores (supplied by puppy mills), and later find the dogs are more responsibility that they had wanted. It would be enlightening to see data ont he percentage of shelter dogs who were originally purchased from pet stores.Puppy mills contribute directly to the overpopulation and thus high kill rate of shelters.(As, of course, does dog fighting, which explains the huge number of pitties, but that's a separate issue.)
    By the way, your congressman and others who want a specific breed of animal can always go to a breed rescue.Or they can find a responsible breeder. They do exist.

    Also, how would prohibiting pet stores from selling puppy-mill animals make kill rates go up? Because they breed animals for profit, puppy millers aren't going to continue to breed at the rate that they do now if this market dries up. It doesn't make sense.

  • Time4Dogs

    “Shelters and rescues DO sell animals in the legal sense of the word, but they don’t sell them to anyone who can pony up. They do a background check of sorts on the people who want the animals to make sure the animals are going to good (or good-enough) homes.”

    Not at the pet expos and pet fairs that I have been to. Dogs go out with the new owner right then and there. Just like a pet store. Not that this is a bad thing. I believe those who want to provide a loving home for a dog or cat should be encouraged to do so. But let’s not pretend that the rescues are morally superior to pet stores, because they aren’t.

    • http://www.caps-web.org carole davis

      Actually, Time4dogs, legitimate rescues are morally superior to pet stores.
      Here are the reasons:
      1.They do not adopt out intact animals and therefore do not contribute to the pet overpop crisis
      2. They do homechecks
      3. The animals are micro-chipped to the rescue in case they get lost or are dumped later. That way, the animal cannot be euthed at the shelter without notifying the rescue org. Also, with that micro-chip, the animal cannot be used for research (yes! CA animal protection law we passed!)
      4. They do not acquire their animals from factories, but from the shelter, thereby disburdening the municipal shelter system and the tax payers. Furthermore, they are not enriching animal abusers by contributing to their profits.
      5. Most importantly, they are SAVING lives. Pet stores save no lives, instead, they condemn dogs to a life in hell while they get rich off of them.

      Carole Davis

      • Time4Dogs

        Davis:

        1. There IS no “overpop” crisis, and not all rescues sterilize the dogs they sell.
        2. Do people who have children have to submit to “home checks”? Ridiculous. And as mentioned earlier, rescues adopt out all the time from fairs and pet expos, with no home check. Good for them.
        3. Not all rescues microchip, either. And chips can result in cancerous tumors, infection, and hemorrhage. But then, it’s not about what is healthy or good for the animal, is it?
        4. Rescues often acquire their animals from private breeders and owners who relinquish them for various reasons. If breeders are abusers, then so are rescuers who sell product they get for FREE for a profit. A small breed rescue here in socal charges as much as $500 for a desirable young puppy. And many animals have had to be rescued from the rescue situation, because often a hoarding situation develops. No one is good enough to “adopt” from them, so they end up keeping most all the dogs.
        5. Rescues are selling animals for profit…Even if that profit is turned back into the group, just like any other business really. They import dogs from third world nations for profit. They provide tax writeoffs for the wealthy con artists who set themselves up as “nonprofits”.
        I have been involved with the setup of a rescue group and I know how they operate.

        • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

          Since Carole is probably getting ready for the protest tomorrow, I’ll field this one.

          Please keep in mind that just like other people and organizations, not all rescues are good. In your comment, you’re giving examples of the worst rescues. The majority of rescues do not function in the manner you described.

          1. There IS no “overpop” crisis, and not all rescues sterilize the dogs they sell.

          Yes, they do. The exceptions would be puppies too young to be sterilized or dogs who are too old or have a medical condition that makes it unsafe for them to go under anesthesia. If a rescue isn’t doing this, they are a bad rescue.

          2. Do people who have children have to submit to “home checks”? Ridiculous.

          Unless the adopter is personally known to the rescue, then yes, all potential homes should be visited, regardless of whether or not they have children. A good rescue will use the opportunity to get to know the adopters a little more before entrusting one of their animals to them. Home checks should not be invasive, and I’ve yet to meet a qualified applicant who had a problem with a home check.

          “Rescues adopt out all the time from fairs and pet expos, with no home check.”

          No they don’t. I have staffed a great many of these events, and I can say from personal experience that the *only* rescues who send home dogs the day of the event are meeting already approved owners (this is actually the case quite frequently), staffing city or county mobile adoptions (by law these shelters are not allowed to discriminate and must adopt the dog to the first person who wants them), or not doing their jobs. Fortunately, there are few of the latter.

          3. Not all rescues microchip, either. And chips can result in cancerous tumors, infection, and hemorrhage. But then, it’s not about what is healthy or good for the animal, is it?

          You are correct — not all rescues can afford to microchip dogs that are brought directly to them from private owners. Thankfully, all dogs coming from the shelter are microchipped. I suppose any substance introduced to an animal’s body can cause harm, but I have never had an experience with an animal having the type of reaction you’re describing. But to answer your question, yes, it is about what’s healthy or good for the animal. If an un-microchipped animal is brought to the shelter and his owners don’t come for him, there’s a good chance he will be euthanized.

          4. Rescues often acquire their animals from private breeders and owners who relinquish them for various reasons. If breeders are abusers, then so are rescuers who sell product they get for FREE for a profit. A small breed rescue here in socal charges as much as $500 for a desirable young puppy. And many animals have had to be rescued from the rescue situation, because often a hoarding situation develops. No one is good enough to “adopt” from them, so they end up keeping most all the dogs.

          Rescues take as many unwanted dogs as they can; the source is not relevant to what they do.

          As for selling product for a profit, this is an argument I’ve seen for years. Generally, those espousing these views are breeders or people rescue have turned down for being unqualified to have one of their dogs.

          “A small breed rescue here in socal charges as much as $500 for a desirable young puppy.”

          As well they should! Desirable young puppies are extremely rare in rescue, and they fee they command helps put a small dint in what they’ve paid in vet bills for the old and sick dogs.

          5. Rescues are selling animals for profit…Even if that profit is turned back into the group, just like any other business really. They import dogs from third world nations for profit. They provide tax writeoffs for the wealthy con artists who set themselves up as “nonprofits”.
          I have been involved with the setup of a rescue group and I know how they operate.

          Good rescues do not behave this way. They may import dogs from third-world nations, but these are the unwanted dogs in danger of being killed. There’s no profit to be made.

          I’m not sure who these con artists are … but no reputable rescue would behave this way.

          It sounds like you were involved with a bad rescue group. I’m sorry you had that experience, but it’s far from the norm.

        • Time4Dogs

          2. Do people who have children have to submit to “home checks”? Ridiculous.

          Unless the adopter is personally known to the rescue, then yes, all potential homes should be visited, regardless of whether or not they have children.

          Sorry I did not make myself clear. I meant, couples who are having a baby do not need to submit to a “home check” for approval to have a baby. It is not necessary for anybody to do a “home check” when placing a dog in a new home either.

        • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

          “couples who are having a baby do not need to submit to a “home check” for approval to have a baby.”

          The difference is that they are having the baby themselves. If they were adopting it, they would have to go through a rigorous screening process.

      • alice in LALA land

        complete BS.. many shelters a( and rescues) do indeed “adopt out’ intact animals.. but then i guess you would say they are not “legit”. Not every dog that retains their reproductive parts use them.. just like people..
        Home checks?? really.. for every cat that is sold? for very dog? I think not. Home checks are an invasion of privacy.. but many dogs are killed because of them.. have another intact animal.. ?? not pet for you ( even a castrated one).. have no fenced yard.. no pet for you.. even if you walk the dog 15 times a day..children under what ever age the shelter does not like? no pet for you and your family.. over 65 .. no pet for you .. too old.. etc.. many shelters and rescue would rather see dogs KILLED than put in a livelong home that does not meet their ‘house check”
        Microchips are not required of many rescues.. tattoos and other forms of ID are often used.. a microchip is no guarantee of a return as there are various companies and most shelters do not have access to all scanners..
        I am not sure where everyone thinks shelter pets come from.. the sky? out of thin air? they come from HOMES where people cannot keep theri pets.. many fo them are heartbroken about giving up their dogs and cats.but let';s jsut call them scum and let it go at that. right?.etc..
        stats on what percentage of pets in shelters are from pet stores are between 2-5% nationwide..that stat from the American Humane Association.. so where are the other 98% coming from? Look up why people relinquish pets.. pretty easy..moving is the first factor..along with money and behavior.. want to help dogs stay in homes and out of shelters.? convince landlords to allow pets..help people keep their pets in their homes.. but lets’ not try to say that shelters are full of “pet store puppies” That is just not so.. 2-5% of dogs purchased in the USA are from pet stores..

        • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

          “complete BS”

          You are now banned from making further comments on this thread.

  • http://www.caps-web.org carole davis

    Response to time4dogs
    I can only surmise that you are a commercial breeder. Who else would like to put whistle-blowers in prison? We are merely investigating wrongdoing and protecting consumers AND animals.

    The Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act was created for entirely different reasons. It is to protect big Pharma, one of the most powerful industries in the world. It will never be used against a group like ours, which works daily with government agencies, law enforcement and lawmakers to protect dogs and cats from inhumane treatment.

    Our activities are entirely legal. Only someone profiting from the mistreatment of dogs would think otherwise.

    • MDurham

      Why do you think that anyone who questions you and doesn’t believe as you do is a (oh, horrors, nasty) commercial breeder–as if that were scum of the earth–which it is NOT? Before you accuse me of being an (oh horrors, nasty) commercial breeder, I am NOT. But I also am not an AR-zombie, sipping the Kool-aid that brainwashes people into believing that most animal industries are *suspect* for *cruelty and abuse* and no one should making a *profit* on animal raising. That, of course, is NOT TRUE, but it is part of the BIG LIE being foisted on everyone by the “animal rights” industry. If you parrot what AR “propaganda mill” BIG LIES say, then you have fallen under their spell. Read Alinski’s “Rules for Radicals”: Repeat a BIG LIE often enough and pretty soon people will start accepting it as the truth! THINK, PEOPLE, THINK! Using the emotion evoked by the AR industry rather than common sense and compassion for animals AND people just sets you up for being an AR-pawn!!!! Most people that I know who raise animals (whether for pets or livestock) care deeply about their animals. There are a LOT of more lucrative ways to make money other than raising animals–which require 24/7 tending, feeding, watering, cleaning, etc. MOST animal raisers live and breathe for their animals. You may not believe that because you are not at that end of the spectrum, but rather at the *negative end* where owner irresponsibility (through lack of education, ecoinomic circumstances, etc.) results in excess animals in an area (NOT all areas, however). The solution to the vast majority of society’s problems is NOT NOT NOT more punitive, human-spirit-crushing actions/laws, but rather working through education and outreach to help people do better. After all, people have the ability to make choices, and helping them make the best choices *for them* (not for your agenda) will often result in win/win for all, including the animals. Trying to ram *your agenda* down people’s throats will NOT work in the long run, but rather result in unnecessary “collateral damage” for both humans AND animals.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “Why do you think that anyone who questions you and doesn’t believe as you do is a (oh, horrors, nasty) commercial breeder–as if that were scum of the earth–which it is NOT”

        Many people, including me, do believe that commercial breeders are the scum of the earth.

    • Time4Dogs

      The activities of the pet store that you are harrassing are entirely legal. But that doesn’t seem to stop you in your quest to shut them down by any means possible. I can certainly see why a restraining order is being sought against you. You even bragged about closing them down a week or so ago for some technical violation of a fire safety law. Brrr, you are really a piece of work.
      Funny, MS. Davis, that when you cannot refute the facts you resort to mudslinging. I do not “mistreat” dogs, and have never sold an animal (not that it would make any difference if I had). I am a pet owner.
      CAPS wants pet stores to stop selling puppies you believe to be raised in a state of abuse and neglect, and replace them with….dogs raised in conditions of abuse and neglect from shelters and rescues instead. Hypocrisy…..

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “But that doesn’t seem to stop you in your quest to shut them down by any means possible.”

        Where in the article or in any of the comments did anyone say CAPS shut down stores by any means possible? They use peaceful protest, humane education and the legal means available to them.

        “I can certainly see why a restraining order is being sought against you. ”

        The court denied the restraining order, likely because there has been no harassment.

    • alice in LALA land

      OF COURSE.. that must be it.. time 4 dogs is a COMMERCIAL BREEDER churning out millions of dogs while writing a blog and answering these posts with honest statistics that cannot be refuted.. LOL
      Straw man.. meet straw woman..

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        How do you know he isn’t a breeder? And quite a few people on both sides have posted statistics.

        This is your final warning, if you continue to insult people, I will ban you.

  • http://www.caps-web.org carole davis

    Yes, we got them shut down because they put the puppies at risk. The City shut them down because we pointed out that they neglected to keep their dogs safe.

    The restraining order she tried to get was denied by the court because I did not harass anyone and that is a fact. Go to the court and check it out.

    And FYI, it is not legal to lie to consumers. It’s called fraud. It’s a crime.

  • http://www.caps-web.org carole davis

    Mdurham,
    My goodness. I guess you only know nice people in agriculture. I am 5th generation of an agribiz family. The animals raised for food are treated miserably in less than minimum standard care. Breeding dogs are treated even worse than some livestock because their anguish lasts a long time. 10 years or more.
    Don’t tell me about the business of agriculture, I am from it.

    • MDurham

      You sound bitter… Is only the negative stuff all you learned from the business of agriculture? There is so much more that is positive, but it’s hard to see that when the AR groups are throwing so much stinky mud at all animal enterprises.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        I have warned you to stop using personal insults to make your case. Please refrain from doing so, or you will be banned from participating further in this discussion.

        • alice in LALA land

          It won’t be much of a discussion if you ban people from”peacefully protesting” on your blog though will it?

        • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

          You have consistently been making inappropriate comments. I warned you several times, but you chose to keep doing so.

    • Geraldine Clarke

      <<>>

      I am from it, too. We, obviously have had widely differing experiences. I spent a lot of my childhood on farms with my relatives; our mutual ancestry in farming goes back eons. I had my own fiber farm for years. The one thing that was obvious from all this experience is that, even if you don’t love your animals (and I never encountered a farmer who didn’t love her animals), caring badly for animals decreases profits.

  • Roni

    There are a lot of mis-facts here. First, shelter kill rates are up by more than 10% in the Los Angeles area in the past year. (http://www.examiner.com/animal-rescue-in-los-angeles/kill-rate-skyrockets-at-los-angeles-animal-services). And, they will continue to rise with the foreclosure rate and influx of third world cultures.

    Secondly, shelters and rescues charge fees to recoup expenses. It takes a lot of money to house and feed animals that irresponsible people brought into this world.

    Third, puppy mills refers to breeders that do not care for their animals; it does not refer to all breeders. Please educate yourselves on the horrendous conditions of animals in puppy mills prior to commenting. Do a google search – videos, articles, blogs, etc.

    • MDurham

      >Third, puppy mills refers to breeders that do not care for their animals; it does not refer to all breeders. <

      Oh, but it is used to refer to the majority of breeders, as if they don't care for their animals–which is just plain FALSE. That's the problem with an emotion-based concept like "puppy mills"–people define it differently, depending on their own personal belief system, NOT on common sense arguments, such as being substandard. To many of the commenters here, for example, any (or almost any) breeder is a "puppy mill" if they produce XX number, sell them for profit, etc., etc.–all kinds of parameters that are individually emotionally based, so NOT objective.

      Just as a question to throw out there, even if 25% of the dogs in shelters were purebred (and I am NOT convinced that's not a pulled-out-of-the-hat figure), that means *at least* the other 75% are oops breedings, i.e., accidental, careless, whatever you want to call it. For example, if pet stores are selling purebreds bred by commercial breeders [NOT "puppy mills" unless that's your definition], and people spend a chunk on them, they may not be as apt to dump them *unless* the economy is so bad that they are losing their homes and it becomes kids or the pets. So, how do you justify attacking breeders for causing the so called "overpopulation problems" when it's more an *owner retention* problem, whatever the cause (economy, etc.)? Think about that.

      It's the AR industry that is fueling the attacks on breeders because, guess what, they want breeding stopped *period*. Talk about research–do some of that on sites other than the AR-influenced sites and you may find a dirty little secret called the incremental animal-elimination agenda. It may not be the way you (as an AR-zombie) feel, but you likely are being used to further the animal/human bond elimination agenda. For the AR fanatics, this generation of animals is acceptable "collateral damage", and humans who raise animals are disposable scum in the attitude and long-term agenda of the "animal rights" movement of *true believers*. If you want to be associated with that, go for it, but be prepared to be fought the whole way by those of us who do not drink the AR-koolaid and who will not accept zombification by the AR fanatics.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “Oh, but it is used to refer to the majority of breeders, as if they don’t care for their animals.”

        Although some animal welfare advocates dislike ALL breeders, many more accept that reputable breeders are working to strengthen the lines of the breed. That said, NO reputable breeder would EVER sell their puppies in a pet store, so “breeders” who do are, by definition not reputable.

        “”puppy mills”–people define it differently, depending on their own personal belief system,”

        Untrue. People define “puppy mills” by their practices and the law. Although this can be an emotional subject, there is far more evidence supporting the flaws in the puppy mill system. It has nothing to do with personal beliefs.

        “So, how do you justify attacking breeders for causing the so called “overpopulation problems” when it’s more an *owner retention* problem, whatever the cause (economy, etc.)? ”

        If they weren’t breeding the dogs, then owner retention wouldn’t be an issue.

        And I can personally affirm that the figure of 25% for purebreeds in the shelter is actually quite low; 35% is more in tune with what I’ve seen over the last 8 years of volunteering and fostering. I’ve taken around 120 purebred dachshunds out of the shelter during that time.

        “that means *at least* the other 75% are oops breedings”

        Your logic is flawed. Shelter dogs come from many situations. Although I’m certain that some shelter dogs do come from accidental pregnancy, far, far more come from puppy mills and BYBs. I can back this claim with personal experience working with hundreds of BYB dogs who were bred for a profit, not for the purpose of strengthening the breed.

        I need for you to stop slinging personal insults, like “AR fanatics,” or I will be forced to ban you from this discussion.

  • Louise Pay

    Carole Davis, West Coast director for Companion Animal Protection Society (CAPS) is a hero to all theses puppies. Thank you for highlighting this petstore and where these puppies come from. keep up the great work everyone.

  • Patty

    I must admit that I am very disturbed by alot of the comments I see here. By the content of your statements many of you seem to see nothing wrong with commercial breeders and are offended by the use of the term puppy mill. Call it what you will, when there are living, feeling creatures confined to cages 24/7 for the sole purpose of producing a product, it is for all intents and purposes a “puppy factory”, and I can’t see any possible way to spin it that makes it humane!!
    Someone else noted the decrease in the numbers of dogs being euthanized in the shelters from the 1970s until now, and that is true, and it is a victory of sorts for the animals. But…and this is a big BUT…3.2 million animals being put to death in shelters each year, simply because there is no more room and nowhere else for them to go, is far from okay!!!
    I AM an animal welfare advocate! I AM a member of an animal welfare organization with a rescue program! I DO NOT go out and accost people on the streets, I DO NOT scream and yell. I DO NOT hate all breeders…I personally don’t see a need but if someone truly breeds a dog because of a love for the breed, I have no problem. BUT, and this is another big BUT… that person is NOT going to have 100 dogs in cages and ship the puppies across the country at 6 weeks of age in order to fill the puppy store cages with cute, 8 week old puppies!!! THAT I have a HUGE problem with. I have personally seen the results both in the puppies, and in the “breeding stock” rescued from these places.
    I have seen the footage of one of the kennels from which “I Heart Puppies” is getting their puppies. I won’t quibble over whether to call it a puppy mill or not….I will simply call it cruel!!

  • Kelly S

    Commercial breeding practices and the Pet stores that pimp their puppies have victims in so many places I cant even count.. First of all children.. the devasted child who falls in love at the pet store only to watch her new best friend, her puppy, suffer disease and DIE a couple weeks later.. My puppymill survivor came with two undiagnosed human contagions that had they not been life threatening, they would not have been diagnosed..One deadly to small children, the other causes permanent baldness.. the Fact that you have zero wellfare of the health and hearts of the children who make these sickly dogs the center of your world makes you despicable and unconscienable and so is Brooke Bradford for personally delivering them into the arms of children..seems extremely negligent.. and I know she knows the history of her suppliers.. playing dumb and picked on isn’t fooling anyone.. I was an office manager for a manufacturing company.. when it comes to knowledge when choosing your suppliers, the only person you may know is your spouse…

    • Time4Dogs

      Oh please! Didn’t you hear of the imported “rescues” that were sick with parvo? Others that were sick with RABIES? Selling “rescue” dogs is not any improvement. Pet stores need to sell animals from breeders who comply with health and welfare standards. There are no such standards with shelter and rescue animals.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “Pet stores need to sell animals from breeders who comply with health and welfare standards.”

        Pet stores do not do this, which is the point of my article and CAPS’ protest.

        Rescue animals are not sold — they are adopted, usually for under $300, a fee that does not even come close to what rescues spend vetting and caring for the animals.

        For example, I took a very sick and old 6-lb dachshund from the shelter last week (we currently have three foster dogs) on whom I will spend a small fortune for having most of his decayed teeth removed and treating the glaucoma in one of his eyes. I am spending my own money and do not expect to reimbursed. When he’s healthy, happy and ready for his new home, I’ll “sell” him for nothing.

        “There are no such standards with shelter and rescue animals.”

        Of course there aren’t. Shelter and rescue animals are the throwaways of the animal world. We take them and do the best we can to make them healthy and happy again. Puppymillers and BYBs do NOT adhere with health and welfare standards, and they breed more and more and more, all to make money.

        • Time4Dogs

          “Pet stores do not do this, which is the point of my article and CAPS’ protest.”

          Pet stores have legal guidelines for obtaining their animals and are also subject to a very strict puppy lemon law.

          “Rescue animals are not sold — they are adopted, usually for under $300, a fee that does not even come close to what rescues spend vetting and caring for the animals”

          And you think it’s different for a breeder? It is nearly impossible to recoup your losses just from the veterinary bills alone. Adopted=sold=commercial transaction. Money changes hands.

        • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

          Puppymillers and BYBs don’t spend much money on the care of their animals, which is the entire point of this article and its comments. Reputable breeders do. I am well aware that reputable breeders make no money from the sale of their dogs. They’re doing it for love of the breed, not money. Please do not confuse my use of “puppymiller” or “BYB” for reputable breeders. They are two different animals.

          The only money nonprofit rescues make from transactions are items they sell online or at expos to help fund their efforts. Most rescues operate in the red. That is a fact.

  • Time4Dogs

    Tamar, you don’t realize that the bar for being a “commercial breeder” is quite low and encompasses most people who breed. The proposed PUPS act will make anyone with an ownership interest in ONE female fall under commercial regulations, if they also sell X number of dogs per year. The AKC considers anyone with six litters per year to be a commercial or high-volume breeder. In some areas sales of just a few puppies requires a seller’s permit. A “commercial” breeder in Texas is now anyone who owns more than 10 intact dogs. It doesn’t even matter if they never breed one litter! They now must comply with commercial regulations.
    The world is truly going insans.

    • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

      Please don’t tell me (or anyone else) what I do and do not realize. I am very familiar with some of the new legislation, for better or for worse. People who have more than 10 intact dogs are, in my opinion, ignorant of their local animal laws or uneducated about the dog overpopulation problem, or they simply don’t care. Anyone who births six litters a year is killing their dog slowly and miserably. The exception would be if different dogs were producing the litters; in this case, the owners should be regulated, according to the laws of California. I am unfamiliar with Texas law.

      • Time4Dogs

        Seriously? You think a dog can have six litters a year? The ignorance is astounding.

        • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

          “The ignorance is astounding.”

          You are now banned from making further comments on this thread.

      • Stormy

        Please tell me I misunderstood this… “Anyone who births six litters a year is killing their dog slowly and miserably.” I tried hard, when I was breeding to convince my dog to have a litter once a year.

        Seriously, statistics (and I’ll post them later sometime maybe) show that ± 5% of dogs may come from hobby or occasional breeders, ±5-6% derive from commercial breeders. The other 85-90% then comes from oops, neighbor to neighbor, imports and, I hate to say this, returns to shelters. Shelters in many parts of the country are empty of desirable purchasable dogs, so they are importing them to fill the demand. And before it’s asked… I don’t breed… but I do believe in the choice of where a person chooses to buy a dog or cat or any animal. It’s the American way, and I do protest those who are attempting to take that away.

        • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

          Please tell me I misunderstood this… “Anyone who births six litters a year is killing their dog slowly and miserably.” I tried hard, when I was breeding to convince my dog to have a litter once a year.

          I was responding to another person’s post, but puppymillers and BYBs do force their dogs to have as many litters as possible, which is a slow, miserable way of dying. We get a lot of these bred-to-death bitches into rescue, and they often have mammary cancer.

  • Stormy

    Because I’m a person who lives for facts, can you give me statistics on how many licensed commercial breeders force their dogs to have as many litters as possible? Were you aware that many Commercial Breeders are in organization that self-inspect and have Ethical Breeders Certificates? And were you aware that there are not that many who have over 50 dogs?

    Somewhere “up there,” it was written that 10 intact dogs (and I’m paraphrasing) are ignorant of the law and uneducated….. Many excellent hobby breeders have 10 intact dogs, are aware of the law and as have been written here more than once, aware that there is an owner retention problem, not a mythical dog over-population problem. The AC shelters are not full of pet store dogs, they are full of dogs, from many sources, that were given up by their owners for a multitude of reasons.

    • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

      “Because I’m a person who lives for facts, can you give me statistics on how many licensed commercial breeders force their dogs to have as many litters as possible?”

      I’m a little busy for research right now, but I’ll look it up later. Feel free to research it on your own if you have time.

      Please do not confuse my use of “puppymiller” or “BYB” for reputable breeders. They are two different animals. You are arguing for the rights of qualified breeders, but they are not germane to a conversation about puppymillers or BYBs.

      “The AC shelters are not full of pet store dogs, they are full of dogs, from many sources, that were given up by their owners for a multitude of reasons.”

      I agree. I don’t think anyone meant to say or imply that pet store dogs were the only dogs in the shelter. They do, however, make up part of that population.

  • Mire

    I wasn’t going to post because I know how stubborn, greedy, and ignorant people can’t be, but it is truly sad how people are supporting this animal hater. The fact that puppy mills exists is disgusting. I understand reputable breeders want to breed forthe love of the breed but what about the hundreds of animals that are euthanized everyday in shelters!? There are puppies who are just a few weeks old and even older pets who want a HOME!!! People who make money for there own self gain are greedy and it is not a reputable business. If u own an animal then you would know how deeply they feel, they love, how loyal they are! They shouldn’t be locked up in a cage of their own feces, crying for attention! Open your eyes and educate yourself so you don’t not sound so ignorant! I am a part of a number of rescues on Facebook and I get SOOOO many pleas for help to save animals on death row, or so many ready for adoption before there time is up! Open your eyes and expose yourself tothe pain that these sweet angels go through. If u can’t feel for them then you are heartless and that is truly truly sad!

    • Geraldine Clarke

      “I am a part of a number of rescues on Facebook and I get SOOOO many pleas for help to save animals on death row, or so many ready for adoption before there time is up! Open your eyes and expose yourself tothe pain that these sweet angels go through. If u can’t feel for them then you are heartless and that is truly truly sad!”

      You get all those pleas because people want your money and many of them will do everything they can to manipulate you into giving it to them.. Please research where you send your money to and make sure it goes to a place that REALLY uses it to help animals. Your local shelter is your best bet. PETA kills almost every animal it gets it greedy little hands on and the Humane Society of the US uses about 1% of what it collects to really help animals.

      I don’t think there is anyone who has participated in this discussion who does not care deeply for animals in distress.

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        “You get all those pleas because people want your money and many of them will do everything they can to manipulate you into giving it to them.”

        This is absolutely not true. Donations are usually raised by a networker, who either PayPals them to the foster parent or rescue or sends it directly to the vet. Although I’m sure there are those who are scammers, it’s far from the norm. Again, I know this from a great deal of personal experience.

    • Animal Lover

      Puppy mills? Please give me the LEGAL definition of one? Else – it’s a non-entity! You are referring to anyone who is a commercial breeder.

      Let’s look at some facts:
      1 – there are not enough show/hobby breeders to satisfy the demand. That would mean only the connected could have a dog.
      2 – the shelters are teaming with only two types – chihuahuas and what THEY (many times INACCURATELY) call pit bulls. Any purebred is auctioned off for far more than their normal rates. OH – and don’t call it adopt – as there is $$ exchanged so therefore – it’s a SALE!
      3 – the shelters are playing with numbers – besides the fact that there are MANY dogs being brought in from 3rd world countries – some RIGHT INTO the shelters!

      So – your eyes need to open and you need to educate yourself – and see a scam when it’s being hashed out in front of you. WHY – if there are so many dogs in the shelters – are the AC groups raiding people’s homes? WHY is there a limit to the number of dogs one can own – but not kids? WHY are there SO many false statements out there about dog’s reproductive capacity? WHY is it OK to rip out a dog’s reproductive organs (MAJOR SURGERY) but it’s NOT ok to crop ears, tails, dewclaws???

      The problem is – 1 – they’re NOT humans and stop putting your human emotions on them, and 2 – there ARE financial reasons a foot – and power! Take away one’s pets and you have more control over them. Just ask the Nazis – who, by the way, were supposedly vegan. This was one of Hitler’s tactics. Incrementalism – and soon – there are NO rights and NO private ownership and NO USA!!!
      :(

      It’s not heartlessness – it’s reality!!!

      • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

        You are making a lot of unsubstantiated claims that have already been refuted by others posting comments on this thread, including me. You have yet to supply proof to back up your statements.

  • http://www.maxapooch.com keith sanderson

    Just because the selling of dogs by large commercial breeders is legal doesn’t make it right. The law allowed slavery in many states, in many states the law allowed the segregation of blacks and whites.

    Those who wished to have the law changed were called terrible names.

    There are good laws, benign laws and bad laws. The laws that govern the mass breeding of dogs are inadequate and their repeal is fought by those who have much to gain by keeping things the way they are. And the way things are make it cheap and easy for them to operate.

    One way puppy sales by puppy mills could be curtailed is to get the AKC to better police to whom they allow to register litters of puppies. Heck, if i were a concientous local breeder I would hate the fact that some poor puppy that is the result of breeding between a brother and sister and has had no screening for genetic problems carries the same AKC registration as the dogs I breed.

    If puppy mills lost the ability to sell AKC pedigreed dogs, Pet Stores that sell puppies would lose much of their market. Why? Pet stores can get $1000 or more for an AKC pooch. It is unlikely they could get $100 for the same animal if it didnt have pedigree papers. The profit motive would be greatly reduced.

    As long as people somehow believe that merely being AKC registered somehow qualifies the health and genetic condition of a dog and are willing to pay high prices for these pups, those ignorant folks will keep the profit in puppies sold by pet shops and bred at puppy mills.

    • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

      Thank you for this post, Keith. I agree with your analogy. One that I use is forced prostitution — the puppymillers are no better than pimps.

  • Elizabeth

    7 Things You Didn’t Know About Puppy Mills

    1) There is no such thing as a “puppy mill”. “Puppy mill” is not a legally defined term, it is slang used by the animal rights community to denigrate any and all breeders — small or large, standard or substandard. It’s the “N-word” of breeders. The phrase “puppy mill” has been promoted in the media by the animal “rights” movement, people who want to end all animal ownership. It is applied indiscriminately by these fanatics to anyone who breeds dogs.

    2) There are three main types of breeders: Commercial, Pet and Hobby/show breeders. Every one of these can be a large-scale breeder, every one of these can be a substandard breeder. Commercial kennels are subject to state and/or federal oversight. Substandard care can be found with all types of breeders. It is about the standard of care, NOT the numbers.

    3) Many commercial breeders have state of the art kennels that meet USDA standards and the standards of their state laws. They are inspected at least yearly and must meet or exceed standards far higher than those expected of the average hobby breeder.

    4)“Sick” puppies do not sell. It is counterproductive for any industry to produce a defective product and expect to stay in business.

    5) Passing laws intended to outlaw “puppy mills” will not solve any problem. Most substandard breeders are already in violation of existing laws. New, stricter laws will only affect those who are already working to follow the laws. The only way to have any effect is to enforce the laws that are already on the books.

    6) All the hobby breeders in this country cannot produce enough puppies to meet the demands of the American market.

    7) BREEDERS are NOT responsible for the presence of dogs in shelters. We have a problem with responsible ownership. Education is the key to improvement in this area.

    For more information:
    http://www.cfodconline.org/
    http://www.petpac.net/
    http://www.exposeanimalrights.com/
    http://www.naiaonline.org
    http://www.humanewatch.org
    http://www.saveourdogs.net
    http://www.nathanwinograd.com
    http://www.saova.org

    • http://www.maxapooch.com keith sanderson

      Here is a challenge for any of you who think people who are against puppy mills and pet stores that sell puppy mills puppies are wrong.

      Spend a month or two working with such an organization.

      See first hand the dogs they rescue, the conditions at pet stores, listen to exemployees discuss how sick puppies weren’t medicated to save moneyand left to die.

      I was a skeptic. I changed my attitude when I learned first hand the claims are not exceptions, they are the rule.

      Then remember this. A society that is desensitized to crutlety to animals, and the suffering of animals, and justifies such activity is one small step away from being equally barbaric to humans.

      • George Baumann

        @Keith Sanderson, “Animal Lover” works in shelters everyday. I was instrumental in forming a local rescue. Your assumption that everyone in shelter and rescue work agrees with your extremist viewpoint is wrong. Not everyone is a Chicken Little. Many of us quietly work to genuinely improve society; while the loud-mouthed protestors only cause harm on many levels. Very sad. But then, what can we expect from people who think it is grand to import puppy mill dogs from China, a country where dogs are bred for meat, and now for the US pet market?

    • Deborah

      Elizabeth, get off your high horse about no such thing as a puppy mill in legal terms. We all know what a Puppy Mill is..Google it or YouTube it and you’ll see exactly what the animal advocates are talking about in here…It’s getting real old with all you people saying the same thing. There really isn’t any use in having a debate or making comments to you [edited for inflammatory language]. Pet Stores sell Puppy Mill Puppies PERIOD….So, when you’re finished YouTubing Puppy Mills and see what we’re talking about then you will become wise. [edited for inflammatory language]

      ***Hi Deborah, Thank you for posting here, but I need to warn you about using inflammatory language, which includes telling people they are idiots. Pets Adviser is not like other blogs — everyone is welcome to post their opinion, but I will make sure that the discussion remains civil. Thanks!***

  • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

    Does anyone know how the protest at I Heart Puppies went today?

    • Patty

      First of all let me say BRAVO to Keith Sanderson for his last comment!!! That is a brilliant suggestion. I don’t think that most people are unkind at heart, but they honestly don’t know. I realize that many believe the claims that puppy mills do not exist or a USDA licensed breeder means it is humane. Those of us who have worked on the frontlines, dealing with the products and cast-offs of these places know first hand that what we are saying is not propoganda…it is fact! We know, because we have researched it at length, but primarily, because we have lived with it! We have held the matted, filthy, malnourished breeding dogs in our arms. We have driven them to their veterinary appts post rescue from the puppy mills and listened to the vets recite a laundry list of medical problems resulting from neglect.
      So again…thank-you Keith!

      In answer to your question Tamar, I think it is safe to say the protest went very well!! There was a large turn out of supporters for our cause…I read somewhere 140! The NBPD was there and extremely helpful and respectful. There were several local residents who came by and some even stayed to lend their support!! Of course not everyone was happy and supportive of our presence there, but that is too be expected. Personally, I felt very empowered and optimistic!! At the end of the day, it’s all about the dogs, and I have high hopes for them for the future. I would love to be a consumer in that little boutique…once “I Heart Puppies” has shown some real love for puppies, and adopted a more humane business model!!

      • Geraldine Clarke

        I’ve not checked into this list for a couple of days so there are many other posts that I haven’t seen yet that I probably should address before this one but I find myself here before reading them. Forgive me if I’m going over old ground or missing things that should be said before this reply.

        Patty,

        I worked my way through grad school by jobs at kennels, both boarding and breeding. And, yes, there were a couple of jobs I applied for that I wouldn’t take because I didn’t approve of the way the dogs were treated, However, I worked for four (2 breeding and 2 boarding/ breeding) that were absolutely wonderful. It was incredibly hard work, the hardest work I’ve ever done, but the dogs were happy, healthy, clean, groomed, exercised, socialized and played with with great joy. The puppies came out healthy and extremely well-socialized to fit in with their new families.

        And this was before there were USDA regulations to follow! Have you read the USDA regs? It’s over 60 pages of incredibly intricate instructions. I doubt that most very good pet owners would pass the tests that USDA-approved kennels have to go through.

        Yes, you have seen horrible things and the people responsible absolutely should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law but saying that ALL commercial breeders are the scum of the earth is just NOT true. There are anti-cruelty laws everywhere that can stop these people. Raising a dog in a kennel is NOT cruelty if it is done well as I have seen it done.

        Yes, you’ve seen the victims, as have I, and I grieve with you about them. I’ve also taken in matted, filthy dogs at death’s door and re-habbed them but there are a lot of great, happy dogs out there that came from commercial kennels.

        • Deborah

          Geraldine…One of the puppy mills I heart Puppies buys from took one of her Goldens and tied it up and shot it in the head. It’s on record. And this place is or was, a USDA kennel…And as for commercial breeders, WHY?????????? You love your dogs so much that I would bet there were people you sold your puppies to that ended up in a shelter and killed. You are not solving the problem you are creating it. Millions die every year in the US.

  • Lowell1

    Irrefutable proof? So then why not contact the district attorney? If someone is doing something ILLEGAL, you take it to the police. If someone is doing something you don’t happen to LIKE, you have no right to “DEMAND” they stop. There’s no definition here of what a “puppy mill” is. Just because someone makes money at raising dogs does not make them evil, any more than someone who makes money as a surgeon is evil — do you expect your doctor to treat you for free?. And finally, the idea that it is “wrong” to sell dogs as long as there are ones in shelters? Perhaps one ought to expand that to children? Is it WRONG to have kids of your own as long as there are those in foster or orphanages? Surprisingly, there’s no movement to “don’t buy a car as long as there are used ones on the lots” either. A person ought to have the freedom to CHOOSE what kind of dog they want. For some, a shelter dog makes a good choice. For others, it does not. Dogs are not “interchangeable” — different dogs (and different breeds) have different characteristics that make them more suitable for some homes than others. And people have every right to pick the kind of dog that is most suitable for them, not be forced to take what someone else chooses for them.

    • Patty

      You are completely missing the point. It is not about taking freedom of choice away from people, but about being a voice for the animals. You can certainly make those comparisons and go in that direction with people/babies, new cars/used cars and so forth (although they do NOT really make sense) but as I said that is really skirting the issue and missing the point. The breeders are making money off of the misery of the animals and THAT is the point. No reputable breeder is EVER going to sell their puppies to a pet store. They want to know where the puppies are going and that they are safe. A reputable breeder will always be happy to introduce to you the mom and pop of the puppy you are buying. Try asking to meet the parents of these pet store puppies and see how far you get…really. These commercial breeders where “I Heart Puppies” is getting their puppies are mass producing puppies strictly for profit. The “parents” are treated as nothing more than pieces of machinery used for producing the desired product…puppies. The requirements that the USDA places on these facilities are so minimal (and in my opiniion still allow for inhumane treatment), but CAPS has proof that even those minimal requirements are not being met with these breeders as they have several documented violations!
      The puppies in the pet store are lucky compared to their parents who remain in the puppy mills. They spend entire lifetimes in cages that are only required to allow 6 inches of space from the dogs nose to cage, and tail to cage! They are kept in those cages 24/7, most often receiving little or no veterinary care! Even a factory producing “things” of other sorts requires maintenance of the machinery to keep it in good operating condition and producing a good product!! This does NOT happen in this type of breeding facility, and aside from the cruelty to the breeding dogs, there are frequently consequences of this neglect that appear in the puppies….significant health issues.
      There is nothing wrong with freedom of choice, but there is nothing right about supporting these operations. We are not trying to put “I Heart Puppies” out of business. We just want them to open their eyes to what is really happening, and if they do indeed love the puppies, demonstrate that through adopting a human business model!

  • Kelly

    Legal USDA documents have been sent to Newport City Council as well as stated on record in a city meeting. They specifically detail numerous and repeat accounts of cruelty, neglect, and failure to provide basic care as well as violations of federal law, “The Animal Welfare Act”. Animals are not product so I wont waste time referencing your unintelligable referance to automobiles. These animals are produced under violations of Federal Law and animals have rights. Consumers need protection from this deception and health and welfare hazzard, not for it to be presenting fraudulently under fair market…[edited for inflammatory language]

  • Lowell1

    Patty asserted that “breeders are making money off of the misery of the animals”. No breeder would be allowed by the USDA to have the kind of conditions shelters have. Nor could any pet shop sell animals “at your own risk” as shelters do. Pet shops are subject to the puppy lemon law. Shelters aren’t. Shelters use sob stories and auctions, not pet shops. Yet the number of PUPPIES in shelters in CA is very small. There would be fewer animals in the shelters if the animal control folk would provide better education regarding the leash law and better education regarding care and management of a pet. Instead, they use the department as a means for high wages (I doubt pet shop owners are pulling down 100 & 200K incomes, unlike LA animal control) and to obtain political power. If you don’t like pet shop pets, don’t buy from them. If you want a shelter dog get one. If you want to buy from a breeder who can provide health data and information about the parents, etc, quit trying to run them out of the state.

  • Geraldine Clarke

    If you have real proof of an inhumane killing, report it to the USDA. They have very strict regulations about humane treatment and, if the kennel euthanized inhumanely, it would have its USDA licence pulled. (But, frankly, if euthanasia is really necessary, a bullet in the head is no more inhumane than chemicals pumped into veins. In fact, it’s over much more quickly. All livestock farmers have guns on hand because, if an animal is in terminal distress, they do not want the animal to wait, suffering for hours, until a vet shows up with her syringes. Sad but true. Life is not a Disney film.)

    Why do you make such ridiculous assertions when you know nothing about me, Deborah? Well, it’s because you have such a “true believer” bias that you cannot understand anything that does not fit into your dogma. I follow EVERY puppy I breed for their whole lives because I love my dogs. I will take back any dog immediately if the owner has a problem. (Only had to do that once when the family’s situation changed dramatically and unexpectedly.)

    I am so sick of being insulted by AR true believers like you. I am NOT a part of the problem. The people who have gotten pups from me want a well-bred, well-raised, healthy saluki; they are not going to adopt a shelter dog instead. NO dog ever died in a shelter because someone got a pup from me.

    Shelter dogs often come with problems. Yes, there are wonderful dogs in shelters but there are also a lot of dogs who were dumped there because of big problems and some of those problems were tragically preventable. (More about that later.) The one shelter dog I have here is rife with problems, both physical and mental, that she will never recover from.

    I used to volunteer at the Assistance Dog Institute when I lived near there. When ADI started, they planned to get their dogs from shelters and, yes, they turned some shelter dogs into great assistance dogs but the failure rate was huge even though they had their pick of the most promising animals available in shelters. So they began to breed their own dogs for the qualities they needed and controlled the socialization of those dogs from birth and the success rate soared! It costs an incredible amount in time, energy and money to train an assistance dog. No organization with limited resources can hope to survive if they adopt a strategy that saps their resources. Yes, it would have been wonderful if all ADI’s dogs could have come from shelters but that dream proved to be totally unrealistic. (And, yes, I know that some of you “animal rights” espousers think that “forcing” dogs to become assistance dogs is akin to slavery, but I know these dogs and I know how much they LOVE their work.)

    Breeders are not the problem. Most dogs that end up in shelters are dumped there because of problems because their owners didn’t know how to properly train and socialize their pup or else got bored when the pup turned into a dog. Instead of spending your time and energy attacking breeders, which is not at all effective, Deborah, why don’t you redirect that energy into programs that teaches people how turn their pup into a good family member who doesn’t cause problems so that they won’t dump him? It would be a much more effective use of your time.

    • Turtle

      I have an idea for you Geraldine. Contact Theresa Strader at Mill Dog Rescue in Co – milldogrescue.org – and ask her about USDA licensed breeders and their standards. She IS an expert and has rescued over 5,000 dogs from these mills in just the past few years. Ask her about the common practice of shooting and drowning dogs that are no longer profitable. Ask her how many dogs were inhumanely killed simply because she could not get there fast enough. Read about her dog, Lily. If you’re wanting the truth, ask someone who knows first-hand.

  • bestuall
  • Kelly

    So Geraldine…although you have extensive knowledge in the area of breeding I am guessing you are a private breeder and I commend you for following your pups welfare and life as a decent breeder should.. However not having a USDA license you are hardly an expert on the topic as those who are highly informed in defending the rights of animals.. I saw the USDA violation report of the breeder who shot her golden retriever in the head while tied to a pole.. By law, not your opinion, that is a violation.. you would think someone who would do such a horrific act would have a well justified reason. This breeder stated to the USDA inspector that discovered her carcass that she shot her because she laid on top of her puppies suffocating a few of them. This heartless inhumane monster is so full of greed, she inhumanely slaughtered the mother she cruely continuously impregnates, in vicious greed under the circumstances of seeing her dollar signs being taken away. So in your words this breeder than should have no license making I Heart Puppies an even more unlawful unconscionable hazzard to animals and consumers. Although what you are doing contributes to our problem of overpopulated shelters, people will still shallowly seek your services and they will be available since you do not have a license to sell to pet stores. I would think as a canine enthusiast and profiteer you wouold be happy individuals are supporting the welfare of the number of your animals that will inadvertently most gauranteed be subject to the shelter system and that they defend the rights of your animals that do not deserve or allowed to be tortured with such blatant disregard for life

    • Deborah

      I’m with ya, Kelly. Neither one of these people are worth commenting to because they believe factory farming of dogs in a puppy mill is OK… Even while the cities are starting to ban them. All they do is sell them online and there doesn’t have to be USDA.

  • Kelly

    who are kidding bestuall….there is no shortage.. they smuggle to avoid the USDA and to make higher profits…propagandic newsletters dont work with people who know the facts!

  • http://www.crankyeditor.com/ Tamar Love Grande

    If you didn’t see today’s article, you might find it interesting.

  • Brenda Calvillo

    I HEART Puppies has closed.  Instead of choosing not to sell puppy mill dogs at their retail space, they will sell them over the internet to gullible consumers.  Great dogs (and puppies) can be found at the local shelter.   

    • PetsAdviser

       Wow, thanks for the update Brenda.